Organizing Lowndes County: Then & Now

Organizing Lowndes County: Then & Now

Home to the Black-led independent political party that first adopted a snarling black panther as its symbol, Lowndes County, Alabama, has long been a stronghold for organizing around Black political and economic rights. In this roundtable discussion, Civil Rights Movement veterans Jennifer Lawson and Courtland Cox were joined by Catherine Flowers, Lowndes-native and founder of the Alabama Center for Rural Enterprise (ACRE). They spoke about their experiences organizing in Lowndes County past and present, from building the Lowndes County Freedom Party in the late 1960s to fighting for access to clean water and sewage disposal today.
You can learn more about the Lowndes County Freedom Party (LCFP) here: https://snccdigital.org/inside-sncc/a...
Find out more about Catherine Flowers and her work in Lowndes County here:
Al Jazeera America, "Filthy water and shoddy sewers plague poor Black Belt counties": http://america.aljazeera.com/articles...
This event was co-sponsored with Duke University Libraries and Duke's Center for Documentary Studies.
The Duke Human Rights Center at the Franklin Humanities Institute brings together an interdisciplinary group of scholars, staff and students to promote new understandings about global human rights issues. We put special emphasis on issues of gender, race, ethnicity, sexuality, religion, income inequality, the environment and artistic responses in our teaching, programming and outreach.