Protecting Our Home Fires Strategy as a Driver for Self-determination

Wednesday, September 16, 2020 - 5:30pm to 6:30pm

Virtual


Speaker(s): 
Dr. Carrie Bourassa

This presentation will focus on the concept of cultural safety, how it can address the impacts of colonization, intergenerational trauma and the burden of health issues that Indigenous Peoples carry. Moreover, I will provide a concrete example of cultural safety that has been mobilized at the direction of the communities we serve - the Protecting Our Home Fires strategy. This model is rooted in self-determination, strengths based, community driven priorities and incorporates the principles of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) and United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) - this despite the fact systemic racism is invariably the leading cause of ill-health for Indigenous Peoples globally.

Register for the event here https://duke.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJEqcuyhqzojG9178wW-q2gQyYa5bpUZs7n2.

Dr. Carrie Bourassa, B.A., M.A., PhD is the Scientific Director of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research Institute of Indigenous Peoples' Health (CIHR-IIPH) and a Professor, Community Health & Epidemiology, College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan. She is an adjunct Professor in the Faculties of Education and Kinesiology & Health Studies at the University of Regina and is the Nominated Principal Investigator for the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI) funded Morning Star Lodge established in 2010, as well as for the recently CFI-funded Cultural Safety, Evaluation, Training and Research lab that will be built by the summer of

Dr. Carrie Bourassa
Wednesday, September 16, 2020 - 5:30pm to 6:30pm
Sponsor
Duke Human Rights Center at the Franklin Humanities Institute (DHRC@FHI)
Event Co-Sponsors
Franklin Humanities Institute (FHI), Native American Student Alliance (NASA)