Story+ Project

Consuming Women, Liberating Women: Women and Advertising in the Mid 20th Century

(2019)

This project seeks to document the turbulent relationship between women, feminism, and the advertising industry. We envision a web-based tool that draws together a guide to collections within the Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History and the Sallie Bingham Center for Women’s History and Culture, both in the Rubenstein Library, related to the scope of women’s experiences during the post-World War II consumer boom and the Women’s Movement of the 1960s and 1970s—women wage earners and professionals, consumers, homemakers, and activists. This tool will work to support future researchers—students and scholars—interested in exploring these themes and our work with courses offered at Duke. This website could include images and highlights of significant items and collections held in the Rubenstein Library, a timeline, oral history interviews, blog posts, and/or advertisements students create based on their research in the collections.

Skills needed

  • Interest in researching the history of women business, and media
  • Interest in using primary source materials for research in an archival setting
  • Experience building websites preferred
  • Attention to detail; excellent note taking
  • Ability to work with a team and independently

Special supplementary application materials preferred

A writing sample and urls for web-based projects completed

Project Sponsor(s): 

Joshua Larkin Rowley, Reference Archivist, John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History, Rubenstein Rare Book and Manuscript Library

Laura Micham, Merle Hoffman Director of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women’s History and Culture and Curator of Gender and
Sexuality History Collections, David M. Rubenstein Rare Book and Manuscript Library

Graduate Mentor(s): 

Meggan Cashwell, PhD

Undergraduates: 

Sonia FIllipow, Sandra Luksic, Julia Nasco

Outcome: 

The team created the Consuming Women, Liberating Women: Women and Advertising in the Mid 20th Century website. You can see mention of this project in this Duke Chronicle article: Story+ program uses archival research to rethink storytelling.

Topic(s)

  • Women
  • Digital Storytelling
  • Civil Rights
  • Archives