Story+ Project

Remote: Race, Racism, and the History of Duke Sports

(2022)

Overview As part of a multi-year initiative to study Duke University’s racial history, this project will document path-breaking student athletes and coaches, revisit watershed sporting events, and seek to understand these key moments and individuals within the context of local, national, and international politics. The project will additionally examine the place of race and sports within powerful institutional debates over issues such as “merit” and black student admissions, campus activism, and the adoption of Title IX. Inasmuch as the project will narrate racial developments in Duke sports history, it will also use Duke sports history to shed new light on the racial landscape on campus and beyond.

Story+ Project This project will offer graduate and undergraduate students valuable opportunities to engage with Duke's racial histories, explore Duke archives, ask critical questions about civil rights at Duke, learn historical methods, and develop collaborative multi-modal scholarship. This team will meet remotely. The first week of the program will orient the students to the academic literature and debates in the fields that shape the project. We will read scholarship on the desegregation of higher education and examine topics such as the NAACP’s school litigation, the tensions between student desegregation and integration, and the rise of black student protests on college campuses. We will also explore major themes in the extant sports historiography. Students will spend weeks two through five conducting research and producing research outputs that will be incorporated (with credit to the students, of course) into a publication for Duke edited volume, a chapter in Duke’s institutional history book, and a podcast.

Skills for Undergraduates

  • Interest in Civil Rights, especially civil rights history at Duke
  • Interest in historical research
  • Openness to engaging complex questions of race and racism at Duke
  • Understanding, or eagerness to learn, about US history and issues race, gender, and class
  • Readiness to actively participate in critical and civil exchanges of scholarly ideas

Skills for Graduate Candidates

  • Interest in Civil Rights, especially civil rights history at Duke
  • Experience with historical research, especially archival
  • Openness to facilitating critical engagement with complex questions of race and racism at Duke
  • Understanding of US history and issues race, gender, and class
  • Readiness to actively participate in, and mentor, critical and civil exchanges of scholarly ideas

*Please note: funds are available for a graduate researcher to begin immediately, continuing through to the end of Story+

This Study+ project will be part of the Duke Institutional History project, supported by the Office of Interdisciplinary Studies.

Project Sponsor(s): 

H. Timothy Lovelace, Jr., Professor of Law, John Hope Franklin Research Scholar

Wallace Wade speaking with his team, circa 1970s. Source https://tobaccoroadblues.com/2011/09/09/the-history-corner-duke-stanford-1971-2/

Topic(s)

  • Duke Centennial
  • Race
  • Sports
  • Civil Rights
  • Education
  • History