The Seine in the City | Conversations with Duke Faculty on Water

The Seine in the City | Conversations with Duke Faculty on Water

"Aquatic Meditations: Conversations with Duke Faculty," in response to the question, “What does Water Mean to You?” Part of the Water Series. Featuring Sara Galetti, Associate Professor in the Department of Art, Art History, and Visual Studies, and Anne-Gaëlle Saliot, Associate Professor in the Department of Romance Studies.

In this Franklin Humanities Institute series, we will explore the manner in which water functions in the works of our colleagues in the humanities, arts, and interpretive social sciences from oceanic voyages to lives built around rivers, from aquatic aesthetics to refugee migration, from water shortage to floods, fluidity to flow, and from water conceived through sacred forms to aquatic life-worlds and ontologies, and representations of them. What are the ideologies and aesthetics of water? and how do we understand the aquatic variously as element, force, life-source, backdrop, limit, border, space, and place? From our largely terracentric view of the world, how do we see how water has been given shape?

Sara Galletti’s project, Paris of Waters, focuses on the impact of water on the demographic, social, architectural, and urban development of the city of Paris through time. It focuses on the impact of water on the demographic, social, architectural, and urban development of the city of Paris through time.

Anne-Gaëlle Saliot’s book, "The Drowned Muse" (OUP, 2015) is a study of the extraordinary destiny, in the history of European culture, of an object which could seem, at first glance, quite ordinary in the history of European culture. It tells the story of a mask, the cast of a young girl's face entitled "L'Inconnue de la Seine" (the Unknown Woman of the Seine), and its subsequent metamorphoses as a cultural figure.