Story+ | Preaching and Protest: Sermons from Duke Chapel during the Civil Rights Era

Story+ | Preaching and Protest: Sermons from Duke Chapel during the Civil Rights Era

Every week, during the turbulent years of the African American Civil Rights Movement in the United States, a minister or ordained scholar preached from the pulpit of Duke University Chapel within Sunday morning services. Who were they? What did they say? What did they refrain from saying? The Story+ Preaching and Protest team investigated the relationship between the regular activity of Sunday morning preaching with the extraordinary public protest and social change between February 1, 1960 (the Greensboro, NC lunch counter sit in) and July 2, 1964 (the passage of the Civil Rights Act). The team researched how preaching in Duke Chapel during the 1960s intersected with the public protest and social change of that era. You can view the 92 sermons they analyzed and more at: https://repository.duke.edu/dc/dukech....

Story+ is a 6-week summer research experience for Duke undergraduates interested in exploring humanities research approaches (archival research, oral histories, narrative analysis, visual analysis, and more). The program combines research with an emphasis on storytelling for different public audiences. In Story+, students are organized into small project teams and have the opportunity to participate in a flexible mini “curriculum” on research methods and storytelling strategies. Team projects may be led by Duke faculty, Duke librarians, or non-profit organizations, and will be supervised on a day-to-day basis by graduate student mentors.